I did not get a lot of “likes” for my identification with Ethan Couch. More of us might like to publicly identify with the person in today’s post! I am Martin Luther King Jr. With Dr. King I stand for the just and dignified inclusion of all people in society regardless of race, ethnicity, nationality, age, economic status, sexual orientation, religion, or any human identifier.

Yesterday, January 15, was Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday and so the United States congress made the third Monday of January a national holiday in 1983. Shane Claiborne has pointed out that while it is appropriate for all Americans to honour him in this way, we should also remember that he firmly believed that the church should be the conscience of the state; the sermon he was scheduled to preach the Sunday after he was assassinated was entitled, “Why America May Go to Hell.” Another stinging indictment of the country’s policies comes in his “Letter to American Christians” which he wrote in the style of one of Paul’s letters. It’s just as relevant to Canadian Christians. Here is his conclusion to that sermon:

So American Christians, you may master the intricacies of the English language. You may possess all of the eloquence of articulate speech. But even if you “speak with the tongues of man and angels, and have not love, you are become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.” You may have the gift of prophecy and understanding all mysteries. You may be able to break into the storehouse of nature and bring out many insights that men never dreamed were there. You may ascend to the heights of academic achievement, so that you will have all knowledge. You may boast of your great institutions of learning and the boundless extent of your degrees. But all of this amounts to absolutely nothing, devoid of love.

But even more Americans, you may give your goods to feed the poor. You may give great gifts to charity. You may tower high in philanthropy. But if you have not love it means nothing. You may even give your body to be burned, and die the death of a martyr. Your spilt blood may be a symbol of honor for generations yet unborn, and thousands may praise you as history’s supreme hero. But even so, if you have not love your blood was spilt in vain. You must come to see that it is possible for a man to be self-centered in his self-denial and self-righteous in his self-sacrifice. He may be generous in order to feed his ego and pious in order to feed his pride. Man has the tragic capacity to relegate a heightening virtue to a tragic vice. Without love benevolence becomes egotism, and martyrdom becomes spiritual pride.

 

So the greatest of all virtues is love. It is here that we find the true meaning of the Christian faith. This is at bottom the meaning of the cross. The great event on Calvary signifies more than a meaningless drama that took place on the stage of history. It is a telescope through which we look out into the long vista of eternity and see the love of God breaking forth into time. It is an eternal reminder to a power drunk generation that love is most durable power in the world, and that it is at bottom the heartbeat of the moral cosmos. Only through achieving this love can you expect to matriculate into the university of eternal life.

I must say goodby now. I hope this letter will find you strong in the faith. It is probable that I will not get to see you in America, but I will meet you in God’s eternity. And now unto him who is able to keep us from falling, and lift us from the fatigue of despair to the buoyancy of hope, from the midnight of desperation to the daybreak of joy, to him be power and authority, forever and ever. Amen.

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